DTM (digital tomosynthesis mammography)

 

Paul L. Carson, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5667 USA




Fig 1. Combined system images acquired <15 min apart after removing, resting and repositioning the breast; DTM (digital tomosynthesis mammography) images above, AUS (automated ultrasound) images below. Reference images are on the left; checkerboard comparisons between reference and homologous image volumes after nonlinear registration are on the right. The DTM and AUS images are registered by the mechanical alignment of the imaging system.  The red box drawn in 3D in the image set from one mode is drawn in the approximate corresponding location in the other mode.  This is a case from a 49 year old with a simple cyst. 















Fig. 2 Tomographic images of a 49-year-old woman’s breast containing a simple cyst (A1), from image volumes acquired minutes apart and registered with MIAMI FuseTM. From left to right are: (A) Reference Image; (B) Checkerboard display with alternating squares from the reference image and the target image before registration; (C) Checkerboard display with alternating squares from the reference image and the target image after registration. (C) shows superior alignment of breast features, especially on the top half  of the image.






Fig. 3 Tomographic images of a 50-year-old’s normal breast (B1: LCC), from image volumes acquired 1 year apart and registered with MIAMI FuseTM. From left to right are: (A) Reference Image; (B) Corresponding image from the registered more recent image volume; (C) Difference Image, showing changes in this breast over the course of one year.



Figure 3 is featured on the front cover of American Journal of Roentgenology’s special Issue on Women’s Imaging (February 2009):


“Image Registration for Detection and Quantification of Change on Digital Tomosynthesis Mammographic Volumes,” on pages 384–387.